What Are the Consequences of Having a Fake ID?

When it comes to fake IDs, most of us think of high school kids or college underclassmen.  Most often they buy a fake ID online or borrow an older sibling’s drivers license to get into a bar or try to buy alcohol or tobacco.  Even though it is common, it is still a serious offense.  Young people pay no mind to the risk of carrying a fake ID. However, using a fake ID can send you to jail and lead to a permanent record.

Bouncers checking IDs at the front doors of bars can turn all confiscated, suspicious IDs over to the police.  Many bars pay uniformed police officers to monitor activity at the front door or have undercover officers spend time inside.  If caught by these officers using a fake ID, you can be taken into custody immediately.

New Missouri DWI Law Changes: Felony Offenses

Arrested and charged with a Missouri DWI in 2017? You should know that recent law changes may affect the outcome of your DWI case and how you are charged. We talked about 2017’s changes to the misdemeanor offenses already, but now it’s time to review a few different felony classes  (C, D, and E) that can be charged under the law.

Missouri DWI/DUI Offenses: Basic Facts Regarding The New DWI Law

C, D, and E Felony Offenses

  • For your third Missouri DWI, you will likely be charged with a new Felony class in Missouri, the “E felony”. You will be charged with an “E Felony” if you are considered a “persistent offender” or if you “act with criminal negligence to cause physical injury to someone”.

    New Missouri DWI Law Changes You Need to Know

    Arrested and charged with DWI in 2017? You should know that recent law changes may affect the outcome of your DWI case and how you are charged. How serious your charges and their consequences are will depend on many factors, but one of the most important is if any previous DWIs are on your record. This factor will also determine how your DWI is categorized. Your first DWI in Missouri will likely be categorized as a misdemeanor (as long as no one is injured). If this isn’t your first offense, the rules become slightly more complicated.

    Missouri DWI/DUI Offenses: Basic Facts Regarding The New DWI Law

    Misdemeanor Offenses

    • For your first DWI offense in the state of Missouri, you will likely be charged with a “Class B” misdemeanor, unless there are people under the age of 17 in the vehicle with you at the time of the offense. In that instance, you can be charged with a “Class A” misdemeanor. Misdemeanors are less severe than felonies and may be able to be expunged from your criminal record after a certain period.
    • For all “Class B” misdemeanors, you can face up to 6 months of jail time, a 30-day license suspension, fines of up to $1,000.00, and/or other penalties.
    • For all “Class A” misdemeanors, you can face up to 1 year of jail time, fines of up to $2,000.00, a license revocation of up to a year, and/or additional penalties.
    • Note: If someone is injured while you were driving while intoxicated, then you may be charged with a “Class E” Felony (a new class of felonies). I will go over the new felony classes in another post.

    When Can I Have My Missouri License Reinstated?

    After your driving privilege has been revoked, suspended, or denied there are specific steps you must take to get it back. The first is to determine the reason(s) why your license was taken away. You can find this information on the letter you received from the Driver License Bureau when your driving privilege was taken away or on your current Missouri driving record under “Department Actions”.

    Second, using the chart found on the Missouri Department of Revenue website, determine the appropriate forms you need to file and the fees you need to pay. If multiple reasons are listed for why your license was taken away, you must file the necessary forms for each reason and pay each associated fee.

    Understanding the Dangers of Speeding

    Over the course of the past few months, I’ve examined the causes of deadly automobile crashes and accidents on Missouri roadways. We’ve already looked at the dangers of distracted driving and drunk driving. Now, I want to discuss the danger of speeding. Many of us speed while we’re driving. I am willing to bet that when many of my readers see a posted speed limit, we think we can do anywhere between 5-10 miles per hour over the speed limit and be safe.

    Don’t worry, you’re not alone! According to one study, nearly 70% of people admitted to speeding on highways and 36% claim they drove 5 miles per hour or more over the speed limit. I know that we all have important things to do and places to be, and speeding 5 to 10 miles per hour over the speed limit may seem harmless at the time. However, regardless of how harmless it seems, speeding is extremely dangerous.

    The Dangers of Driving While Intoxicated

    In 2016, 933 people died on Missouri roadways due to automobile crashes and automobile accidents. In a recent blog I discussed how the numbers of traffic fatalities have rose sharply over the past several years and 2016 was no different. Unfortunately, there were sixty-six (66) more road fatalities in 2016 than there were in 2015. Even though that may not seem like a major leap, consider that there were nearly 170 more traffic fatalities on Missouri roads in 2016 than in 2014!

    The numbers are rising and there are things we can all do to help. We already know about the dangers of distracted driving discussed in blog entry from a few months ago. Another major area of concern and contributor to Missouri traffic accidents and traffic collisions are those involving individuals who are driving while under the influence of alcohol or drugs (also known as “DUI/DWI”). According to the Center for Disease Control, nearly one in three traffic deaths involve a drunk driver. During a ten year period, the CDC discovered that 3,314 people were killed in Missouri crashes when they involved a drunk driver.

    Is a DWI a Felony or Misdemeanor in Missouri?

    Being convicted of a DWI (driving while intoxicated) or DUI (driving under the influence) charge in the state of Missouri is a criminal matter. These charges can be extremely serious and can potentially follow you for the rest of your life if they’re not properly handled. Heavy fees, license suspensions, community service, jail time, and permanent charges on your criminal record are a few of the consequences you may face.

    How serious your charges and their consequences are will depend on many factors, but one of the most important is if any previous DWIs or DUIs are on your record. This factor will also determine how your DWI or DUI is categorized. Your first DWI or DUI in Missouri will be categorized as a misdemeanor. If this isn’t your first offense, the rules become slightly more complicated.

    Helping Columbia Residents Get Home Safe in 2017


    It’s no secret that when it comes to education, entrepreneurship, and industry, those of us who live and work in Columbia, Missouri know how to get down to business. That being said, we also know how to party. Stroll the streets of downtown Columbia during a major holiday or Mizzou sports weekend, and you can definitely see the alcohol flowing freely. Though our law enforcement has made great strides in the past several years in reducing the number of drunk driving fatalities and arrests, we still have a long way to go to get that number down to zero.

    On a national level, there were nearly 10,000 alcohol related driving fatalities in 2014. 205 of these occurred in Missouri, ranking us in the top 10 for drunk driving for that particular year. Add these statistics to our extremely low beer and wine taxes (2nd and 3rd lowest in the nation, respectively) and you have a toxic brew.

    5 Common Missouri Car Crash Myths

    If you’ve been reading my blogs, you’re already aware of the fact that driver safety is something I’m passionate about. It’s important to me that I not only do everything I can to protect my clients who have been in tragic car crashes, but to also do everything I can to educate drivers about protecting themselves from future crashes. There’s a lot we can do in the state of Missouri to prevent accidents and crashes.

    As a personal injury lawyer who’s also an advocate for roadway safety, I often hear stories about individuals who have been in a crash or know someone who was and believe certain facts to be true that actually aren’t. I hear some interesting car crash myths when meeting with potential clients for the first time.

    The Dangers of Driving While Distracted

    Everywhere you turn, people are using their smart phones or electronic devices.  Oftentimes, pedestrians on their cell phones are looking down and are not paying attention to the what’s in front of them.  In fact, these people are now called “smartphone zombies.”  A smartphone zombie is described as someone “who walks slowly and without attention to their surroundings because they are focused on their smartphone.” 

    Even though that’s a humorous name for people we all know (and might be ourselves) who use their cellphones while walking, there can be serious consequences for distracted walkers.  For example, when the Pokemon craze hit this last summer there were reports of distracted gamers walking into ponds, running into other pedestrians, and even falling off of cliffs!  Now imagine those people behind the wheel of a car or truck!

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